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Baby Sunscreen 101:
A Busy Parent’s Guide

If you’re ready for more sunshine, rays your hand.

 

BY VICKI MARTINEZ

 

Baby Sunscreen 101:
A Busy Parent’s Guide

If you’re ready for more sunshine, rays your hand.

 

BY VICKI MARTINEZ

 

You’ve just covered your baby with hugs and kisses for the umpteenth time. Before you venture outside to enjoy a sun-filled outing, you may need to cover them again—with sunscreen.

Inspired by Babyganics’ “Sunscreen 101,” this Live Naturally guide shares important information for choosing a sunscreen that’s safe and effective for little ones’ glowing skin.

 

You’ve just covered your baby with hugs and kisses for the umpteenth time. Before you venture outside to enjoy a sun-filled outing, you may need to cover them again—with sunscreen.

Inspired by Babyganics’ “Sunscreen 101,” this Live Naturally guide shares important information for choosing a sunscreen that’s safe and effective for little ones’ glowing skin.

 

What do all the terms mean?

We’ll start by shining a light on a few sunscreen terms.

 
 

Sun protection factor. Contrary to popular belief, SPF does not indicate how long you can stay out in the sun. Rather, SPF is a rating that tells you how much longer it will take for skin to burn with sunscreen versus without sunscreen. For example, skin covered with SPF 50 sunscreen takes 50 times longer to burn than skin with no sunscreen. 

 
 

Both are ultraviolet radiation that cause skin damage and may increase the risk of skin cancer. Ultraviolet A (UVA) rays reach deeper layers of the skin and affect aging. Ultraviolet B (UVB) rays cause sunburn.

 
 

Protects against both UVA and UVB rays.

 
 

Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, which are found in physical sunscreen (as opposed to chemical sunscreen). Mineral sunscreen ingredients physically block UVA and UVB rays because they sit on top of the skin.

 

What do all the terms mean?

We’ll start by shining a light on a few sunscreen terms.

Sun protection factor. Contrary to popular belief, SPF does not indicate how long you can stay out in the sun. Rather, SPF is a rating that tells you how much longer it will take for skin to burn with sunscreen versus without sunscreen. For example, skin covered with SPF 50 sunscreen takes 50 times longer to burn than skin with no sunscreen. 

Both are ultraviolet radiation that cause skin damage and may increase the risk of skin cancer. Ultraviolet A (UVA) rays reach deeper layers of the skin and affect aging. Ultraviolet B (UVB) rays cause sunburn.

Protects against both UVA and UVB rays.

Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, which are found in physical sunscreen (as opposed to chemical sunscreen). Mineral sunscreen ingredients physically block UVA and UVB rays because they sit on top of the skin.

 

 
 

Who needs sunscreen?

Regardless of skin tone, all kids need sunscreen protection. The skin of babies and young children is very sensitive, which means it’s more vulnerable to sun damage.

However, the American Academy of Pediatrics doesn’t recommend sunscreen for infants six months or younger. One, because their hyper-sensitive skin is more prone to skin reactions. And two, because direct sun exposure should be completely avoided at that age to prevent the risk of heat stroke.

 

Who needs sunscreen?

Regardless of skin tone, all kids need sunscreen protection. The skin of babies and young children is very sensitive, which means it’s more vulnerable to sun damage.

However, the American Academy of Pediatrics doesn’t recommend sunscreen for infants six months or younger. One, because their hyper-sensitive skin is more prone to skin reactions. And two, because direct sun exposure should be completely avoided at that age to prevent the risk of heat stroke.

 

When should sunscreen be applied?

Apply sunscreen whenever sun exposure is possible. Whether heading to the beach, the lake, or a shaded park, the importance of protecting that soft, fresh, unmarred skin cannot be overstated.  For best results, apply sunscreen 15 to 20 minutes before making a move in the light direction.

 

When should sunscreen be applied?

Apply sunscreen whenever sun exposure is possible. Whether heading to the beach, the lake, or a shaded park, the importance of protecting that soft, fresh, unmarred skin cannot be overstated.  For best results, apply sunscreen 15 to 20 minutes before making a move in the light direction.

 
 
 
 

 
 

How much is enough?

Go for the total eclipse effect. And remember to get the ears, hands, and tops of the feet.

Sometimes it’s hard to tell if you’ve covered enough, especially with spray sunscreens. We like Babyganics Mineral Sunscreen Lotion SPF 50+ because it’s white when applied, making it simple to cover everywhere (except where the sun don’t shine).

 
 

How much is enough?

Go for the total eclipse effect. And remember to get the ears, hands, and tops of the feet.

Sometimes it’s hard to tell if you’ve covered enough, especially with spray sunscreens. We like Babyganics Mineral Sunscreen Lotion SPF 50+ because it’s white when applied, making it simple to cover everywhere (except where the sun don’t shine).

 

Which sunscreens are most effective?

Before you take a shine to a certain sunscreen, check the label.
Here’s what we recommend looking for:

 

Which sunscreens are most effective?

Before you take a shine to a certain sunscreen, check the label.
Here’s what we recommend looking for:

 

 
 

Why Babyganics?

We love that all Babyganics products are made with thoughtfully chosen ingredients. Their cruelty-free formulas are dermatologist tested and made without:

 

Why Babyganics?

We love that all Babyganics products are made with thoughtfully chosen ingredients. Their cruelty-free formulas are dermatologist tested and made without:

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