Photo Credit: Barilla®

Mussels Au Gratin

A wonderfully flavorful appetizer.

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mussels recipe

Mussels Au Gratin

A wonderfully flavorful appetizer.
Total Time: 20 minutes
Course: Appetizer
Keyword: barilla, mussels
Author: Barilla®

Ingredients

  • 4 ½ pounds mussels
  • 3 ½ ounces breadcrumbs
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons parsley chopped
  • 2 lemons
  • salt and pepper

Instructions

  • Carefully wash the mussels, passing them multiple times under running water to remove any dirt and impurities.
  • Place a saute pan over medium heat with 1 tbsp oil.
  • When hot, add 1 clove of peeled garlic.
  • When the garlic becomes golden, add the mussels.
  • Cover and cook until open, then remove from the heat and let cool.
  • In the meantime, collect parsley, remaining garlic finely chopped, breadcrumbs, salt and remaining oil in a bowl. Mix with a wooden spoon until smooth.
  • Once the mussels are cool, open them and separate the empty half shells from the ones with the mussels.
  • Place the half shells with the mussels on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Fill the shells with the breadcrumb mixture. Bake in a 400° F oven for a couple of minutes or until the mussels are golden.
  • Serve either warm of cold, with a squirt of lemon juice if you like.

Notes

Chef’s Tips
This is a great way to prepare left over mussels from other recipes like mussel soup. All you have to do is prepare the stuffing and bake the mussels in the oven.
Food History
People have been eating fish in most of the world for over 2,000 years and the same holds true for shellfish, especially with regards to populations that lived close to the sea. It is believed that the Greeks and Romans really liked oysters and mussels. In fact, the Romans farmed mussels beginning in the 1st century B.C.
Considered to be an aphrodisiac for years due to their shape, mussels continued to be eaten during the Middles Ages, especially in monasteries where the monks couldn’t eat meat. The mussels were prepared in various ways and most of the recipes have been passed along unchanged until today.
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